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Houseplants for Balconies, Terraces and Covered Gardens

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Publisher: Bloombox Club
Bloombox Club

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creativity houseplants

Warm weather is spreading across the UK, with some areas expected to reach 30°C before the end of the week!

Sunshine has taken on a whole new significance in recent weeks, as the weather can mean the difference between reuniting with friends and family and remaining indoors with members of your household. 

For us, summer says BBQs, ice cream and sunburn - but what does it mean for houseplants?

You may have seen your plants growing more rapidly in recent weeks as they enter their ‘active growing phase.’ For most indoor plants (which tend to come from tropical settings) high temperatures and longer days mean more nutrients and better growing conditions. You’ll need to increase watering slightly to maintain your plant’s moisture requirements, and mist your humidity-loving plants every few days, as our summers are far dryer than the subtropical settings they’re used to. 

Some indoor plants will now happily sit in partially shaded balconies, terraces or even open garden spaces. Exposure to the elements and the chance to shed some dust stand to benefit your green friends, and will add interest to outdoor areas of any size (if you’re lucky enough to have one).  

TIP: If you decide to bring your plants outside, make sure you keep them in their growing pots, as they’re unlikely to survive a British autumn! 

How do I know if my plants can go outside?  

A word of caution before you bring you unroot your entire plant collection: most houseplants lap up warmth and light, but will shrivel in direct sun. Similarly, some plants are either too fussy or too delicate to risk moving from the spot they’ve adapted to. While an Areca Palm could get caught in a sudden summer rainstorm and be fine, a Calathea or Orchid might be gone for good. 

Plants for shaded balconies and covered terraces 

Plants from hot humid climates should flourish when the temperature is consistently in the 20s and 30s. Just make sure you’re giving them enough moisture to compensate for the temperature increase, and monitor for signs of malcontent.  

Some of our favourites for these intermediary indoor/outdoor spaces are Monsteras, Areca Palms, Sweetheart Plants, Hoyas, Strelizias and Pothos plants

A short spell in a summer shower will also suit these guys, provided the temperature remains warm, and the pressure isn't so strong that it could damage the plant itself. 

Indoor plants for areas without much shade 

Emerald Palms, Shark Fins, Aloe plants and Mother-in-Law’s Tongues are all good pics if your outdoor space doesn’t have much in the way of shade. However, if you do start to see discolouration, reboot your plant-sunbathing mission!

Plants that shouldn’t be moved outside

Fussy plants, sensitive to environmental upheaval should probably remain indoors throughout the summer months, though you could try moving them to a shaded balcony if you’re willing to take a minor risk. 

These include the Alocasia ‘stingray,’ most Calatheas and the Fiddle Leaf Fig



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